マーケット・ブログ

MARKETS
06 July 2020

Questions Around the Fed’s Inflation Targeting

By Amit Chopra

Ever since the Federal Reserve broached the subject of average inflation targeting and price level targeting in early 2019, the market has been waiting for some guidance on what it all means for monetary policy. The recent Fed Listens summary gave us little insight into the Fed’s thoughts on inflation. If anything, it highlighted the dichotomy that exists between Wall Street and Main Street on this topic.

The Fed Listens summary brought to the forefront that Main Street in not as concerned about the inflation undershoot as is the Fed. This is no doubt because Main Street is not well served by rising prices. Unlike the Fed, those on Main Street do not feel a pressing need to push prices higher. Rather, they see little or no benefit from inflation. A large percentage of people live on a fixed income, and for others wages are not going up fast enough to keep up with prices of their major consumption bucket: food, healthcare and drugs to name a few. One panelist’s comment from the Fed Listens event in Chicago really drove this point home: “It’s expensive to be poor in America.”

So then why is the Fed hellbent to get inflation above 2%? Its reasons are many. The Fed wants low and steady inflation as that provides a foundation for stable economic growth. The Fed wants to have some cushion to stimulate economic activity in case of a slowdown. The Fed also wants to avoid the trap of debt deflation. This is where depressions occur, as the real value of debt rises due to deflation. This debt burden then leads to a cycle of defaults, drops in collateral values, and declines in lending activity and growth. The Fed also realizes that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” and does not want to see the US come anywhere close to an entrenched period of deflation like Japan has experienced. Beyond these concerns around deflation, there is the issue of the debt overhang in developed markets that has built up over the ages. This debt burden needs to be addressed and many believe that in the absence of inflation, debt would become untenable.

Is the Fed’s fear of deflation overstating the risk? We are a long way from deflation and it is not evident that low inflation drives lower real growth. Does 1.5% versus 2% inflation really impact consumer behavior, business investing and lending activity? Consumers likely cannot tell this small difference in price levels and businesses are more driven by inherent growth opportunities as opposed to marginal price differences. The Fed likely fears our economy could be on a path similar to that of Japan. But, there is no real evidence of this as structural dynamics are different here in the US. Our corporate sector is healthier, our banks are solvent, our demographics are better, and our fiscal and monetary policies are more informed and coordinated. The asset bubble collapse in Japan was also of a larger scale. Besides, Japan’s real per-capita growth and income numbers remained healthy through their long episode of disinflation/deflation. What’s more, regarding debt deflation, debt dynamics in a world of QE and growing central bank balance sheets are less of a risk as would have been the case if the private sector balance sheet exploded.

Is 2% really the right inflation target? The Fed’s preferred measure of inflation, core personal consumption expenditures (PCE), has averaged 1.6% since the Fed adopted a 2% inflation target in January 2012 and has been in a fairly stable range of 1.25%-2.0% on a 12-month rolling basis. An inflation target of 1.5% versus 2% would have meant we have been meeting our inflation objectives, which could have led to better sentiment and better inflationary expectations. Also, the underlying inflationary impulse in the US economy is hard to know in the given moment, and it varies over time. This is the case as the non-monetary drivers of inflation, such as productivity, demographics, technology and global trade are constantly changing. So why does the Fed have such a rigid target and should it adapt a range as its target?

Why are we printing so much money when there are no signs of sustained deflation, and is this making things worse? The Fed’s liberal policies have drawn the ire of many market participants due to potential unintended consequences and the impact of its policies on asset prices. Our sovereign debt burden is mounting, aided by the Fed’s balance sheet expansion. These excesses will have to be unwound sometime in the future. Are we just kicking the can down the road to future generations? Additionally, economies with low interest rates are sustaining structural damage through misallocations of capital and economic dynamism/falling productivity; meanwhile, inequalities are rising. Finally, there is the question of the seemingly insurmountable debt levels in developed markets. Is inflation the only way out from under of this debt burden? Ironically, central banks may be encouraging the growth of debt by keeping interest rates doggedly low, leading us further down the debt trap.

As focused as bond investors are on the Fed’s inflation targeting approach, it remains an elusive concept to Main Street. There are numerous open questions on this topic that the Fed needs to address as it enters a new inflation targeting regime. The Fed should clearly articulate its inflation goals to the financial world and perhaps more importantly to Main Street.

投資一任契約および金融商品に係る手数料(消費税を含む):
投資一任契約の場合は運用財産の額に対して、年率1.0%(抜き)を上限とする運用手数料を、運用戦略ごとに定めております。また、別途運用成果に応じてお支払いいただく手数料(成功報酬)を設定する場合があります。その料率は、運用成果の評価方法や固定報酬率の設定方法により変動しますので、手数料の金額や計算方法をこの書面に記載することはできません。投資信託の場合は投資信託ごとに信託報酬が定められておりますので、目論見書または投資信託約款でご確認下さい。
有価証券の売買又はデリバティブ取引の売買手数料を運用財産の中からお支払い頂きます。投資信託に投資する場合は信託報酬、管理報酬等の手数料が必要となります。これらの手数料には多様な料率が設定されているためこの書面に記載することはできません。デリバティブ取引を利用する場合、運用財産から委託証拠金その他の保証金を預託する場合がありますが、デリバティブ取引の額がそれらの額を上回る可能性があります。その額や計算方法はこの書面に記載することはできません。投資一任契約に基づき、または金融商品において、運用財産の運用を行った結果、金利、通貨の価格、金融商品市場における相場その他の指標に係る変動により、損失が生ずるおそれがあります。損失の額が、運用財産から預託された委託証拠金その他の保証金の額を上回る恐れがあります。個別交渉により、一部のお客様とより低い料率で投資一任契約を締結する場合があります。
© Western Asset Management Company Ltd 2020. 当資料の著作権は、ウエスタン・アセット・マネジメント株式会社およびその関連会社(以下「ウエスタン・アセット」という)に帰属するものであり、ウエスタン・アセットの顧客、その投資コンサルタント及びその他の当社が意図した受取人のみを対象として作成されたものです。第三者への提供はお断りいたします。当資料の内容は、秘密情報及び専有情報としてお取り扱い下さい。無断で当資料のコピーを作成することや転載することを禁じます。
過去の実績は将来の投資成果を保証するものではありません。当資料は情報の提供のみを目的としており、作成日におけるウエスタン・アセットの意見を反映したものです。ウエスタン・アセットは、ここに提供した情報が正確なものであるものと信じておりますが、それを保証するものではありません。当資料に記載の意見は、特定の有価証券の売買のオファーや勧誘を目的としたものではなく、事前の予告なく変更されることがあります。当資料に書かれた内容は、投資助言ではありません。ウエスタン・アセットの役職員及び顧客は、当資料記載の有価証券を保有している可能性があります。当資料は、お客様の投資目的、経済状況或いは要望を考慮することなく作成されたものです。お客様は、当資料に基づいて投資判断をされる前に、お客様の投資目的、経済状況或いは要望に照らして、それが適切であるかどうかご検討されることをお勧めいたします。お客様の居住国において適用される法律や規制を理解し、それらを考慮する責任はお客様にあります。
ウエスタン・アセット・マネジメント・カンパニーDTVM(Distribuidora de Títulos e Valores Mobiliários)リミターダ(ブラジル、サンパウロ拠点)はブラジル証券取引委員会(CVM)とブラジル中央銀行(Bacen)により認可、規制を受けます。ウエスタン・アセット・マネジメント・カンパニー・ピーティーワイ・リミテッド (ABN 41 117 767 923) (オーストラリア、メルボルン拠点)はオーストラリアの金融サービスライセンス303160を保有。ウエスタン・アセット・マネジメント・カンパニー・ピーティーイー・リミテッド(シンガポール拠点)は、キャピタル・マーケット・サービス(CMS)ライセンス(Co. Reg. No. 200007692R) を保有し、シンガポール通貨監督庁に監督されています。ウエスタン・アセット・マネジメント株式会社(日本拠点)は金融商品取引業者として登録、日本のFSAの規制を受けます。ウエスタン・アセット・マネジメント・カンパニー・リミテッド(英国、ロンドン拠点)は英金融行動監視機構(FCA)により認可、規制を受けます。当資料は英国および欧州経済領域(EEA)加盟国においては、FCAまたはMiFID IIに定義された「プロフェッショナルな顧客」のみを対象とした宣伝目的に使用されるものです。
ウエスタン・アセット・マネジメント株式会社について
業務の種類: 金融商品取引業者(投資運用業、投資助言・代理業、第二種金融商品取引業)
登録番号: 関東財務局長(金商)第427号
加入協会: 一般社団法人日本投資顧問業協会(会員番号 011-01319)
一般社団法人投資信託協会

-->